Nov. 28th, 2009

28/11/2009

Nov. 28th, 2009 10:31 pm
Nadia has given me a possible partial solution to the problem of Form.

It's actually something I've experimented with, for the current novel, actually. I would say it was a failure in terms of content generated, but perhaps not so much in terms of structure. 

Writing at this pace has been good for me. I have less of the bipolar ups and downs. Or rather, it's in a much less compressed time-scale. That's worth something, at least. 

Justine Musk:
A young woman described the memoir she wanted to write.

The story gripped me: a bright and talented child struggling to assert herself against narcissistic parents, become the master of her own identity. Except every few minutes she would backtrack and say how her parents weren’t actually that bad, they had a lot of good qualities, she was grateful for the life they had given her…


When she talked like this, her body language became stiff and awkward, her voice a bit robotic.

It was like she was flipping between two personalities: the good daughter she had been trained to be, and the bad daughter, the rebel daughter, she wanted and needed to be.

I heard myself say, “You need to write like the bad daughter.”

 
Personally, I translate the last sentence to 'You need to be honest when you write.' 

Not just in a memoir, but when you write (fiction -- not sure it works the same way with, say, a newspaper article). 

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